Tag: hospitalist.

Another Bloody August. Mysteries and Muddles. And Hospitalists.

Update: The current (November 2014) hypothesis among my doctors is that whatever they were called in my past posts — Dieulafoy lesions, Cameron’s erosions, or bleeding ulcers — all these bleeds have their source in the portal hypertension which comes from cirrhosis which is caused by my auto immune system attacking my bile ducts, that is, my primary biliary cirrhosis.

Silly me. I look back on my post from earlier this month, An Uneventful Day, Unlike Last August 2, and wonder. There I wrote about how on August 2, 2010, I had an arterial lesion burst where the esophagus meets the stomach, and how nice it was that this August 2, 2011, was so comparatively uneventful.

Little did I know that just 11 days later I’d be back in the ER. Circumstances weren’t quite as dramatic this time around — no ambulance — and I got only 2 transfusions compared to last year’s 4. But in some respects, this episode of vomiting blood was worse.

Why am I inflicting this on you? Actually, I am writing primarily for my readers who like me have primary biliary cirrhosis. There’s more not understood about that disease than is known, and I feel it might prove worthwhile to use the internet as a way to compile and compare histories.

I accept last year’s diagnosis of a Dieulafoy’s lesion, which I attained after consulting my hepatologist, not content with the GI’s conclusion that I had a spurting gastric ulcer. This year the diagnosis is gastric erosion, but I’m not convinced for some of the same reasons I wasn’t last year. While swallowing is a problem some times, once food hits my stomach, all is well — spicier the better.

It seems too weird I can go a year without a stomach-ache while having such a torn up gut that I end up in the ER — too weird considering I am at risk for esophageal varices as a result of portal hypertension as a consequence of PBC.

My intuition tells me the PBC was at least a contributing factor to the Dieulafoy’s lesion, and to this latest event as well.

So this is what I want to know: has anyone else out there with PBC landed in the ER vomiting blood not from varices?

And Now for the Muddles. And Hospitalists.

I keep copies of my medical records. Last year I discovered from the hospitalist’s history that “I got dizzy, and came to the emergency room.” When I complained that this wasn’t an altogether accurate way of describing arriving via ambulance, lights and siren, IV’s in both arms, on O2, my objections were dismissed. This year, I found out that I had been vomiting blood for 2 days when I came to the ER. Wrong again. First, I’m not an idiot. Second, I told the zillion people who had to have the day’s events recounted, that I had vomited twice that afternoon before coming to the ER.

Why can’t these hospitalists listen?

And what, you ask, is a hospitalist anyway? If you are a slow learner like me and it takes you years to realize your [now ex-] general practitioner is too indifferent to bother with hospitalising her own patients, you are stuck with a hospitalist “managing” your case. In my experience this year and last, they are, at best, obstructionists.

This year’s example of foolishness:

In the triage room, I felt really bad, clammy and sweaty. Then I was on a gurney being rushed to the ER trauma room. It wasn’t like fainting, because it wasn’t gradual (when I’ve fainted, usually things turn black but I can still hear what is going on, and then I’m down). I wasn’t out for long, and the ER staff started getting fluids in me as quickly as it could. Seems to me an obvious case of hypovolemic shock. This happens with blood loss.

But the hospitalist saw things differently. He wanted to know about my history of seizures. I don’t have one. What, this has never happened before? Well, yea, once, last year, when I was throwing up golfball-sized clots of blood. Ah ha, so you do have a history of seizures. No I don’t.  How I hate being in no position to resist.

Next thing I knew I was wheeled away and my head was in the damn doughnut — a brain CT, looking for the cause of my “seizures.” CT was normal (duh), so the next day in comes the EEG woman to stick wires on my head. EEG normal — well a bit of excess in the betas, probably related to anxiety (does exasperation count as anxiety?).

This year, 20 hours passed before I had an endoscopy to look for the cause of the bleeding, compared to last year’s 4. Meanwhile, my hematocrit kept falling. Finally, when it hit 7.3, 32 hours after my arrival, I was transfused, compared to pretty much immediately last year.

Was there a connection between the relative slowness of dealing with the problem (blood loss) this year and the the hospitalist’s obsession with seizures?  I don’t expect to ever know the answer. It was, however, most definitely an annoyance I didn’t need.

At Risk for Esophageal Varices and I Nearly Bleed Out from a Gastric Ulcer: How Weird Is That?

Update: The current (November 2014) hypothesis among my doctors is that whatever they were called in my past posts — Dieulafoy lesions, Cameron’s erosions, or bleeding ulcers — all these bleeds have their source in the portal hypertension which comes from cirrhosis which is caused by my auto immune system attacking my bile ducts, that is, my primary biliary cirrhosis.

If you’ve read any of my posts on primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), you were probably surprised by yesterday’s post that there wasn’t some sort of medical muddle involved. Wonder no longer: there was. It’s just that my emphasis was different so I left it for today.

I’ve written about being at risk for esophageal varices as a result of having PBC. These are swollen veins (like varicose veins), caused by portal hypertension (itself caused by cirrhosis [in the case of PBC — there are others. Click through to a site devoted to patients’ experiences with it]) in the esophagus. Left untreated these could “burst and bleed into the gut.”

But I had an endoscopy just this past January that showed only a trace of varices, and in such cases, 96% of people are trouble-free for at least 1-2 years (then they do another scope).

Of course, that means 4% of people aren’t.

So as soon as I regained consciousness in the ambulance, I alerted the chief EMT to tell the folks in the emergency room about this. And when I got there, I told them myself.

I will refrain from elaborating on how it feels while being transfused to have to repeatedly explain primary biliary cirrhosis and spell Urso Forte [the drug I take for it] to the ER nurses, and later my floor nurse and abdominal ultrasound technician.

However, following the endoscopy performed there in the ER trauma room, the GI who did the procedure reported that I lost enough blood to require four transfusions not because any esophageal varices burst, but because of a “gastric ulcer spurting blood.” He repaired it with three hemostatic clips and put me on pantoprazole.

But how weird is that? To be at risk of burst esophageal varices and have a gastric ulcer burst instead?

I reviewed my endoscopy report (high marks to the GI, who actually gave me a copy of my own medical report!) and found the location of the ulcer to be the cardia. Googled that, and discovered it is right where the esophagus becomes the stomach, and, in fact, for many years there was debate as to which organ it belonged to.

Now then, there is a new kid on the block at the hospital: the hospitalist. This person is sort of in charge of patients who come in through the ER and whose regular doctor doesn’t admit or have any role in their care. Like me. It took me two days to get someone to tell me who was really in charge of my case: the GI who did the procedure, or the hospitalist.

When the hospitalist visited me, I explained about my surprise that my bleed was gastric and not related to portal hypertension [PBC]. I told him that I didn’t have a local GI, but that I was under the care of a hepatologist at the UAB med center.

So the next day he returns, and says, “Good news: you don’t have to have a liver transplant.” I thought yeah, duh, but let him continue. He told me he had set up an appointment with the hepatologist who would do another endoscopy. And I said that sounds great, but what about this report from the GI deeming the cause of the bleed to be a gastric ulcer? The poor guy looked confused. I suggested he go back and have another (an initial) read of  my endoscopy findings.

But the hepatologist’s office and I agree that I should be seen by him. I have so many questions: can a burst esophageal varice adjacent to the cardia be mistaken for a spurting gastric ulcer? Is it really possible to have such an awful gastric ulcer and no abdominal pain? Can portal hypertension cause a gastric ulcer? Will this happen again? And will I have no warning other than feeling steam-rollered before it does?

And just how weird is it, if it was a garden variety gastric ulcer, for this to happen to a person who has to worry about bursting varices?

Stay tuned.