Tag: hg

How It Feels to Have an Injectafer Iron Infusion

8/15/17: Folks, I have stepped away from this. I’m no longer keeping up with it. So far I still have enough iron reserves, over 2 years since my injections, and since I had the TIPS procedure (a shunt to relieve portal hypertension in my liver), I have had no bleeds or anemia. I’d like to add, however, that you need to do something about severe anemia because over time it can stress the heart. But that is another story. Best of luck, and if you have reactions, strongly encourage your hematologist (and use a hematologist, not a family doctor) to report them to the company. Best of luck! (And I no longer eat ice, by the way!).
Today (8/25/16) I sent an e-mail to American Regent, the company that markets Injectafer in the US, with a link to the comments page. On the contact page, there is an email address for reporting Adverse Drug Events, if you would like to contact them yourself.

I have ceased having bleeding from my varices and my blood counts are normal. I am glad that I was able to tolerate Injectafer well enough to get my body the jump-start required to bring my iron reserves to normal levels.

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The usual caveats about this not be medical advice, etc. all apply to the following. My purpose in writing this post is to provide something I couldn’t find when I was scheduled for and after I had an Injectafer iron infusion last April: a personal account. There are a number of resources for studies of Injectafer’s safety and effectiveness, but that is not all I want to know.

Injectafer was approved by the FDA in July 2013, so it is fairly new. My understanding is that the older types of iron infusions are a lot more problematic, side effects were more common, and it took hours to receive the infusion. But I have no experience with that.

If you are here, you probably already know that delivering iron through an IV is an alternative when oral iron supplements haven’t worked in alleviating iron deficiency anemia.

Followers of this blog will know that, as a consequence of primary biliary cirrhosis and portal hypertension, I have had 10 gastric bleeds from burst varices and 17 transfusions since August 2010. The past (nearly) 14 months have been good ones, with only a single 2-transfusion bleed in February 2014.

However, in spite of the 2 transfusions, I continued to feel run down and fatigued. For one thing, although the normal hemoglobin range is 12 to 15 (or 11.7-15.5. or 11.3-15.2 — depending on the lab; I have results from 3 labs here), transfusions after a blood loss, which usually adds about 1 point to the score per transfusion (or so I think — again, an ordinary person’s understanding and not a hematologist’s is all you are getting here) are usually stopped once the patient gets into the 10s. One reason is that with every transfusion, the possibility of having a reaction to the next is more likely. Another is that usually the patient’s body will bring itself up to normal levels in a few weeks either through diet alone or with iron tabs.

The first of April, about 6 weeks after my 2 February transfusions, I had my labs done and my hg was 9.7. I can cope in the high 9’s, but coping is about all. Basically, being anemic means being oxygen deprived. If you want a similar experience, go hiking at sea level for a few hours, and then go above 12,000 feet and do the same. In another couple of weeks I had crept up to 10.5 on the 12 -15 scale; better, but not great. My family doctor sent me to a hematologist. My iron level  was 31; normal is 40-160. Two Injectafer infusions were scheduled for a weak apart for early May.

Hematology and oncology go together, and I know that since I don’t have cancer I should have nothing to say about this other than how grateful I am. But the truth is, it is really a sad and sobering experience to have to go to an oncology infusion center. Most people are there for chemo. Of course I knew I was the lucky one in the room, but you know, it is still depressing. In fact, I think the worst part of the whole process was when I was waiting to schedule my little infusions and the man ahead of me broke down crying at the desk. The doctor came out and said this time it wouldn’t be so bad. It didn’t help much.

Getting the infusions was quick. Each took about 20 minutes for the little bag to drain into my veins. It hurt a bit, but not badly; it’s an IV and those are rarely for me painfree. The iron looks like you might expect — brownish with a bit of red.

I thought the infusion would have immediate effects, that I would leave the building infused with energy.

It does not work that way.

Most surprising was that I actually felt worse for several days after the first infusion. I felt like I had been run over by a steamroller that had then backed up and done it again. I felt like I had reached the end of hope, that for the rest of my life I would never again have energy.

When I mentioned this to my hepatologist in September, he said he had heard this from others, so it is not just me. The thinking is that any time the body is hit with a sudden infusion of something it has never had before — like a load of iron all at once — it is going to have to process it, get used to the idea, make some internal adjustments, and that is fatiguing,

I didn’t feel much of anything after the second.

But about a week later, I  noticed that I wasn’t dragging around so forlornly.

After another week, I stopped eating ice.

A Connoisseur of Ice

I used to eat ice all the time. I mean it, all the time. In the middle of the night I would awaken to eat ice. Simply sipping water wasn’t enough; I’d have to go to the freezer for ice. I’d never leave home without at least one tall glass full. When I traveled I carried a small ice chest, full of ice. I decided I would probably not ever enjoy going to Europe again because I remembered the one time I went to the UK, 35 years ago, getting ice was hard, and I simply liked it then. I had my favorite source of ice: Sonic. One of the things that made hospital stays tolerable was that hospitals have good ice. The only thing I missed when I moved a few years ago was the crushed ice dispenser on my fridge door. I craved ice.

Then I didn’t. I still am thirsty all the time because I have Sjorgen’s syndrome which means my salivary glands are also under attack by my immune system, so my mouth is always dry, and my teeth have gone to hell, but I don’t eat ice. I drink fluids.

Eating ice is a pica — the consumption of non-nutritional substances, like chalk, soil, or sand as well as ice. Frankly, for an anemic, it seems it would make more sense to crave soil, but I’m glad it doesn’t, and of course, talking what makes more sense among things that don’t make sense is senseless itself.

But no one knows why people with anemia crave ice.

My Normal hg

On June 2 had an hg of 13.9, up from the 9.7 hg of April 2: a significant improvement, and my iron reserves zoomed from 31 to 163 at the end of August. So now I have stored iron with which to make new red blood cells. On 9/11 my hg was 13.6.

So my experience with Injectafer: excellent.

I wish I had known it would take weeks to work and I’d actually feel worse for a while after the first infusion, but now, if you are wondering what to expect, you have one report from the field.

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