Search Results for: cameron's

Cameron’s Erosion Erupts (Again): Bleed the Eighth

Update: The current (November 2014) hypothesis among my doctors is that whatever they were called in my past posts — Dieulafoy lesions, Cameron’s erosions, or bleeding ulcers — all these bleeds have their source in the portal hypertension which comes from cirrhosis which is caused by my auto immune system attacking my bile ducts, that is, my primary biliary cirrhosis.

Back when I first decided to write about having primary biliary cirrhosis in November 2009, I never figured that this would become my bloody blog. I have neglected the blog for months because if I am going to follow through with my plan to write an account of living with this auto-immune illness, then I have to, once again, post about another bleed. Each has its own special moments, however, and here I have two warnings for you, and a comment from my gastroenterologist.

Once again, as in bleed 7, the culprit was my Cameron’s Erosion (or Lesions), an ulcer “in the hiatal sac of patients with hiatal hernia,” which is how Wiipedia’s 2-line article describes the thing. You know you have a rare condition when Wikipedia has next to nothing. I described what I learned about Cameron’s after bleed 7.

The link to PBC is that because my liver is compromised by the disease, it is too dangerous to repair the hiatal hernia.

I’m getting better at identifying the onset of these bleeds, anyway. This time I even drove myself to the hospital. Signs were clear: black BM and the taste of iron in my mouth.

Now for the three things that made this bleed memorable, and some advice.

1. Do not let a doctor put in an IV. There is some incompatibility between all the things that I might need intravenously during a bleed, and so I end up with IVs in both arms. I had a great nurse in the ER who inserted the first IV as painlessly as I can remember. Then this doctor or resident drifted in. I could tell he hadn’t been on the job long — and thought he was God’s gift to the world — because he was wearing a V-neck scrub top that let me see way too much of his curly chest hair way too close up. He wanted a little practice with IVs, I guess. So he tried to start the second line. And failed, miserably. Blood spurting and me doing the vasovagal response — that is, fainting. Finally the nurse guided the doctor’s every move and the second IV was inserted.

She was a great nurse, and I asked her later, how do you stand that — doctors coming in and thinking they can do all you can, and you having to deal with the aftermath. Diplomatically, professionally, she responded that at least that doctor will think twice before he gets snippy when a nurse has trouble with an IV.

2. It hurts like hell to have your stomach pumped. And it’s worse when there’s no reason to do this. My bleeds sometimes have two parts: black stool and vomiting. The vomiting always happens, but when both occur, usually comes an hour or two later. This time, I got to the ER before I vomited. All that I needed was time, but for reasons best known to himself (and that itself is a problem), my ER doctor decided that instead of letting things take their course, he would pump the blood from my stomach.

Never again. I would have been better off sitting outside the doors of the ER until I threw up.

I always imagined stomach pumping would involve a tube down the throat, turning on the pump, and whoosh, all done.

It isn’t like that.

This is what it is like to have your stomach pumped: A tube is inserted up your nose and down your throat. If the first nostril tried gives the nurses trouble, then they start over with the second. They keep giving you water to drink so you swallow, and swallow down the tube. Maybe it was just me, maybe the tube was just lodged against a nerve, but it hurt like hell the entire time the tube was up my nose and down my throat. 

And the entire time isn’t a matter of minutes. It’s a matter of hours. The pumping is slow and not constant. You watch the content of your stomach (in my case, red blood followed by black) slowly proceed down this thin tube. Sometimes it starts flowing backwards. 

I supposed most who OD and have their stomachs pumped are out of it. I can’t imagine that anyone who has had it done would risk OD’ing twice. I was not out of it. Other than a local anesthetic sprayed in my throat, I had no recourse but to lie there in pain between 1 and 5:30 in the morning and watch my blow flow out of my stomach.

I talked to my floor nurses about this, and each said, you always have the right to refuse a procedure. And refuse I shall. 

3. Don’t go out during lightening storms. This was her advice when I asked my gastroenterologist how often people have both PBC varcies and Cameron’s lesions. First she suggested buying lottery tickets, and then backtracked, since having bad luck doesn’t mean having good luck too. (I spent an hour at the Harrahs in Cherokee last week and never once was ahead.)

Actually, her advice misses the mark. Not going out during lightening storms is an action I can take to avoid without fail being one of the rare people struck down.

But there is no way I can avoid without fail the next bleed.

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My 13th — and Perhaps Final — Portal Hypertension Bleed

At the end of my previous post, My Mother’s Last Three Days, I announced that I had had my thirteenth portal hypertension bleed at my mother’s death bed.*

It had happened. A bleed. A big one. I was taken to the hospital by ambulance.

I think that I have never been nearer to a complete breakdown than I was that night in the ER. Why a bleed now? Even if she had had enough opiates to cloud her memory, my last memory of my mother will be this: not being there for her.

The usual thing, the IV’s, the history, the whole admissions rigmarole proceeded. I told the GI on call that night if I wasn’t going to be scoped in the morning when there may still be a chance of finding the source of the bleed, that I wouldn’t consent at all to an upper endoscopy. The gastroenterologists here have repeatedly delayed up to twenty hours between the start of a bleed and their looking for its source, and then are surprised when they find none. A bleed can stop on its own, and the IV medications, as I have explained before, aid this.

I was taken for the endoscopy at 8:30 or so in the morning.

When I was returned to the room, my husband was there. He had his news, and I had mine. His presence was enough to tell me what his was: my mother was dead.

Mine? The GI who did the endoscopy said that what she had seen was something she could not fix, and neither could her colleagues. I needed to get to a teaching hospital as soon as possible.

I had a stray blood vessel resting over two large varices. Normally, if I understood her correctly, this vessel could have been cauterized, but as it was positioned, there was a risk of burning through the vessel and into my varices, causing a massive bleed.

Things had gone for bad to worse. I was too distressed to be surprised, quite frankly.

So we got in contact with my hepatologist at the University of Alabama in Birmingham about six hours away, and an appointment was set so that he could have a look for himself first thing Monday morning.

Here are the pictures from the July 9 endoscopy clearly showing the problem in my esophagus. I think the doctor said the purple things were large varices that couldn’t be banded because of the blood vessel that couldn’t be cauterized because of its position.

In my next post, I’ll explain how things got worse — again.

*(To catch you up if you are new here, I have Primary Biliary Cirrhosis (or Primary Biliary Cholangitis), and since August 2010, I have had some minor and a some awful episodes of vomiting blood —  hematemesis — because of bursts varices in my esophagus. There have been lots of co-diagnoses along the way, from ordinary ulcer upper GI bleeds, to Cameron’s Erosions, to Dieulafoy’s Lesions, but as will become evident, whatever you want to call the spouting body, the source was likely always the same: the portal pressure in my portal vein in my liver measured 15 on July 16, 2015,  dangerously high. It is now 2 to 4. More on that later.)

3 in a row 4 in a row ang1 arrows angi2 angie3 angie-4

Bleed 11, An Exploratory Endoscopy, Bleed 12, Injectafer Again

My trials with gastrointestinal bleeds continue. Simply go straight up and click Primary Biliary Cirrhosis or Portal Hypertension Bleeds if you are a late arrival to this wearisome party. At this point I think I keep chronicling them so I can remember myself, have I had 11 bleeds or 12? How many transfusions so far?

The Halloween Bleed 2014

I was trundling down the tracks uneventfully — how lovely an uneventful life can sometimes be — when I derailed on October 28, 2014. I started with melena, and so my husband drove me to the ER; I knew from the metallic taste in my mouth the upper GI bit would begin soon.

As one friend said, some people will do anything to  win the Halloween costume contest.
As one friend said, some people will do anything to win the Halloween costume contest.

Now every bleed has its moments, and this was during the Ebola scare. I thought I could perform a useful service to the Ebola response team every US hospital was throwing together last fall, so I told the triage nurse that within minutes, probably no more than an hour, I would be throwing up blood. She stopped me. Had I been to Africa or been around anyone who had? No and no. However, I continued, since I posed no infectious risk, I was the ideal test: get a team suited up, handle me as though my emesis had an unknown cause, and see how well they did with avoiding getting any bloody vomit on exposed skin. She scurried away and passed me to a different waiting room for labs.

The tech just about had time to get the needle in when up came the red blood, a good bowl full (I had brought my own bowl). We were crammed in a tiny room where another nurse was charting. The two looked horrified. I said, I told triage this would happen.

On a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being worst yet (the first, early August 2010), this bleed ranked about a 2, and only because it was both a melena and emesis event. I didn’t need transfusing. The Injectafer iron infusions I had had back in April stood me well.

But then I made a mistake. After each upper GI bleed, the GI on call for the practice that has a monopoly in this town does an endoscopy to ostensibly find the source of the bleed. Since these scopes occur on average 18 – 22 hours after the bleed, and since in the meantime I have received bags of IV octreotide that stop GI bleeding, these are really Cover Their Asses exercises so they don’t discharge me with an active bleed. They have never once found the source of the bleed. Once you stop a bleed in the GI tract and it has had time to clot, chances of finding it are too small to bother with.

Back to the mistake, and the second memorable moment. The GI visited my room and said, while he didn’t think he had found the source of this bleed, he did find some oddity. “I stared at it for a long time.” This was what he had to say about the oddity he decided to call an ulcer and to put a clip on (another scar!) even though he said it was in an odd place, wasn’t bleeding, and wasn’t the color or shape expected. But to answer my questions he repeated, “as I said, I stared at it for a long time.” (How very reassuring!) He wanted to stare at it again in 3 months.

And like a fool, like an idiot, I foolishly, idiotically agreed to return February 3, 2015, so he could stare at it again.

February 3, 2015: The Exploratory Scope

So in I go as an outpatient, in fine fettle. Hg on January 21 of 13.1. Very respectable.

And the mysterious it? Vanished. The doc found the usual Cameron’s Erosions. I had a look at the pictures from his scope, and said, well, guess I’ll be back here soon. He said, on the contrary, all looked fine, no banding needed.

February 12, 2015. Bleed the Twelfth.

Nine days after the unremarkable exploratory I was in the ER again. This was a major bleed. On my new, devising as I go along, scale of 1-5, I’d say maybe a 4.0 to 4.5 based on projectile emesis and brief loss of consciousness. I still haven’t seen the stair stretcher or whatever it is the EMTs use (when I’ve needed it, I’ve been too far gone to see it).

My biggest fans will know two things seem familiar here. One is the date. A year ago, Feb. 12, 2014, I had had a bleed on the first anniversary of my collie’s death. Now it was the second anniversary. Rascal bled out, by the way. Undiagnosed tumors burst on his spleen. Well, that is just coincidental gothic bad luck.

But I’m not so sure about the other coincidence. The last time I had an exploratory scope in this city, I had a bleed about 64 hours later. 

That’s it. All done. I will have exploratories at University of Alabama-Birmingham (med school) Kirklin Clinic, but not here.

And I may refuse any post-bleed scopes here as well. But that is a story not yet completed. For now let’s leave it at this: February 3, 2015, as an outpatient in good heath I had Managed Anesthesia Care (meaning a nurse anesthetist is present throughout the procedure). On February 13, 2015, as an in-patient who had lost an estimated 3 – 4 units of blood less than 24 hours previously, I did not.

Back to the Injectafer Infusions

I left the hospital after Bleed 12 with a hg of 9.1. I had not been transfused. Two weeks later my hg had dropped to 8.7, and so I had my iron reserves checked:   My iron was at 28, % saturation 6, and ferritin 4. So the hematologist this time ordered two sets of Injectafer (4 infusions).

I should feel better by April 10.

At least I am now caught up on chronicling my crises.injec

Injectafer infusion

Always Bleeding from the Same Scar: Bleeds 9 and 10

There’s a new series of posts I am planning, but first I need to catch up on my bloody misfortunes. It’s been a year since my last post on a bleed, caused by portal hypertension, in turn itself caused by damage to the liver, in turn caused by my autoimmune illness, primary biliary cirrhosis. But I have had two since then, and am now up to 17 transfusions.

First, let me say something about these transfusions. I wouldn’t be here tonight if it weren’t for people who give blood. Sometimes when I’m wandering around, I ask myself: was it her? Or him? Whose blood is in my body? I cannot know, but I thank anyone who has ever given — or even just tried to give — blood. These are rare and strong and generous people.

Back to these bleeds. Number 9 hit in September, when I was in Miami, trying to help my 84-year-old mother, and was a 2-transfusion bleed, as was bleed 10, that waited until February, less than a month after I moved my mother out of Miami. This one occurred a year to the day after my beloved collie died of hemangiosarcoma, a canine cancer that causes sarcoma to develop. Mine was on my dog’s spleen. It ruptured, and he bled out.  

The doctor who performed the endoscopy here couldn’t find the source of the bleed.

But a month later when I went to see my hepatologist at University of Alabama’s Kirklin Clinic, he found an actively bleeding varix at the fundus, where the stomach and esophagus meet. The site of multiple bleeds of mine has been at that little crook to the left of where the arrow is pointing.

File:Illu stomach2.jpg

In fact, this is the same site as my first — and still worst — bleed, the one that that the GI who saw me in the ER thought to be a bleeding ulcer and that for a while my hepatologist thought might be a Dieulafoy’s Lesion or a Cameron’s Erosion.

But after reviewing my records, now the theory is that the same area keeps bleeding because it was weakened by the three clips (like tiny clothes pins) put in as an emergency approach to shutting down the 4-transfusion bleed I wrote about back in August 2010.

Banding, essentially using the equivalents of rubber bands, to cut off the supply of blood to a bleeding varix or one that looks like it could become a bleeder, is the preferred approach.

The clips are a last resort.

The reason I keep having these bleeds may then be because the delicate walls of the esophagus have been compromised by the clips.

One thing others with primary biliary cirrhosis should know is that having these bleeds is extraordinarily unusual. I asked my hepatologist if other PBC’ers have similar problems with repeated bleeds, and he said, no, he has never seen or read of a comparable case.

I think then that it is best we end with the inspiration for the title of this post: David Bowie’s “Always Crashing in the Same Car.”

 

 

PBC Bleed 7. The Vesuvius Within Me. Crashing in the Same Car.

Good thing I finally got around this month to describing November’s bleeds 5 and 6 in this continuing realtime account of me and my PBC (primary biliary cirrhosis) because now it’s already time to move along to bleed 7.

This was a rather dramatic one, occurring in the wee hours of January 18, 2013. My hemoglobin [hgb] dropped to a personal worst of 6.1, I landed in the ICU and then on the cardiology floor, and required 3 transfusions. A couple of days ago my hgb was 10.5, mildly anemic, but I feel great.

Why the ICU and cardio unit? Because when your hemoglobin drops that low (normal for post-menopausal women = 11.7 to  13.8), it means none of your organs — including your heart — are getting enough oxygen.

What went right this time was that the Asheville ER got a gastroenterologist in to perform an endoscopy immediately, while I was still actively bleeding. Except for my first bleed, in Huntsville the doctors waited 20 hours or more to ‘scope, after drugs and IV fluids had stopped the bleeding.

You can’t be sure of the source of the bleed if you don’t see the bleed.

The Asheville GI theorized what I had this time around was a Cameron’s Erosion. This is erosion in the stomach near the diaphragmatic haitus which is a hole where the esophagus passes into the stomach. The junction should be below the diaphragm, but if you have a hiatal hernia, as I do, then it is above the diaphragm. Usually, hiatal hernias cause no bother other than indigestion. But I have other things going on as a result of the PBC, namely protal hypertension and gastric and esophageal varices. (If you search “cameron’s erosions” + “portal hypertension” + pbc, Google comes up with 75 results, which in the Googleverse is close to zero.)

Now as it happened, I had an endoscopy and visit planned with my hepatologist, Dr. Brendan McGuire, at University of Alabama-Birmingham’s Liver Center for January 22 and 23. So immediately after leaving the hospital on the 21st, we headed south.

Dr. McGuire scoped me Tuesday morning and reported he agreed with the Asheville doctors. He described the area as not unlike a scrape on a kid’s knee that scabs over, but before it gets a chance to heal completely, keeps getting banged up. He didn’t see the site of my first bleed until a few weeks had passed but thinks this one was in its vicinity if not the same place.

So it could be like I keep crashing in the same car, having the same bleed over and again. Since I wasn’t scoped during bleeds 2 through 6, we’ll never know.

Why not fix the hiatal hernia? Too risky: its position, the sites of the erosion and varices, the amount of scar tissue, the thinness of the veins — lots of reasons.

What can be done: double the dose of beta blockers I’m taking to slow heartbeat and of antacids to reduce stomach erosion. And hope that the Vesuvius within me remains dormant.

And what about my primary biliary cirrhosis? I’m doing just fine there, holding fairly stable. It could be years and years before it is bad enough to warrant a transplant. There is something called a MELD score. Normal people’s is zero. Those near dead of liver failure have a score of 40. I’m at 8. Bleeds don’t factor in.

So all I have to do is hope I don’t erupt.

But what we need now is a little relief from the dreariness of reading about me going on about vomiting blood.

I suggest a segue to youtube to view some loveliness: David Bowie singing “Always Crashing in the Same Car.”

You can choose between this one with a particularly happy Bowie, or the GQ Awards show where Bowie wore sandals with socks, or this with a sassy Bowie around 3:18. Or all and more (like here, where he isn’t playing the guitar and seems not to know what to do with his arms).

—————–

PS: Although it doesn’t have much about PBC, this site has a cool diagram of possible diagnoses related to liver trouble.

Another Bloody August. Mysteries and Muddles. And Hospitalists.

Update: The current (November 2014) hypothesis among my doctors is that whatever they were called in my past posts — Dieulafoy lesions, Cameron’s erosions, or bleeding ulcers — all these bleeds have their source in the portal hypertension which comes from cirrhosis which is caused by my auto immune system attacking my bile ducts, that is, my primary biliary cirrhosis.

Silly me. I look back on my post from earlier this month, An Uneventful Day, Unlike Last August 2, and wonder. There I wrote about how on August 2, 2010, I had an arterial lesion burst where the esophagus meets the stomach, and how nice it was that this August 2, 2011, was so comparatively uneventful.

Little did I know that just 11 days later I’d be back in the ER. Circumstances weren’t quite as dramatic this time around — no ambulance — and I got only 2 transfusions compared to last year’s 4. But in some respects, this episode of vomiting blood was worse.

Why am I inflicting this on you? Actually, I am writing primarily for my readers who like me have primary biliary cirrhosis. There’s more not understood about that disease than is known, and I feel it might prove worthwhile to use the internet as a way to compile and compare histories.

I accept last year’s diagnosis of a Dieulafoy’s lesion, which I attained after consulting my hepatologist, not content with the GI’s conclusion that I had a spurting gastric ulcer. This year the diagnosis is gastric erosion, but I’m not convinced for some of the same reasons I wasn’t last year. While swallowing is a problem some times, once food hits my stomach, all is well — spicier the better.

It seems too weird I can go a year without a stomach-ache while having such a torn up gut that I end up in the ER — too weird considering I am at risk for esophageal varices as a result of portal hypertension as a consequence of PBC.

My intuition tells me the PBC was at least a contributing factor to the Dieulafoy’s lesion, and to this latest event as well.

So this is what I want to know: has anyone else out there with PBC landed in the ER vomiting blood not from varices?

And Now for the Muddles. And Hospitalists.

I keep copies of my medical records. Last year I discovered from the hospitalist’s history that “I got dizzy, and came to the emergency room.” When I complained that this wasn’t an altogether accurate way of describing arriving via ambulance, lights and siren, IV’s in both arms, on O2, my objections were dismissed. This year, I found out that I had been vomiting blood for 2 days when I came to the ER. Wrong again. First, I’m not an idiot. Second, I told the zillion people who had to have the day’s events recounted, that I had vomited twice that afternoon before coming to the ER.

Why can’t these hospitalists listen?

And what, you ask, is a hospitalist anyway? If you are a slow learner like me and it takes you years to realize your [now ex-] general practitioner is too indifferent to bother with hospitalising her own patients, you are stuck with a hospitalist “managing” your case. In my experience this year and last, they are, at best, obstructionists.

This year’s example of foolishness:

In the triage room, I felt really bad, clammy and sweaty. Then I was on a gurney being rushed to the ER trauma room. It wasn’t like fainting, because it wasn’t gradual (when I’ve fainted, usually things turn black but I can still hear what is going on, and then I’m down). I wasn’t out for long, and the ER staff started getting fluids in me as quickly as it could. Seems to me an obvious case of hypovolemic shock. This happens with blood loss.

But the hospitalist saw things differently. He wanted to know about my history of seizures. I don’t have one. What, this has never happened before? Well, yea, once, last year, when I was throwing up golfball-sized clots of blood. Ah ha, so you do have a history of seizures. No I don’t.  How I hate being in no position to resist.

Next thing I knew I was wheeled away and my head was in the damn doughnut — a brain CT, looking for the cause of my “seizures.” CT was normal (duh), so the next day in comes the EEG woman to stick wires on my head. EEG normal — well a bit of excess in the betas, probably related to anxiety (does exasperation count as anxiety?).

This year, 20 hours passed before I had an endoscopy to look for the cause of the bleeding, compared to last year’s 4. Meanwhile, my hematocrit kept falling. Finally, when it hit 7.3, 32 hours after my arrival, I was transfused, compared to pretty much immediately last year.

Was there a connection between the relative slowness of dealing with the problem (blood loss) this year and the the hospitalist’s obsession with seizures?  I don’t expect to ever know the answer. It was, however, most definitely an annoyance I didn’t need.

An Uneventful Day, Unlike Last August 2

Update: The current (November 2014) hypothesis among my doctors is that whatever they were called in my past posts — Dieulafoy lesions, Cameron’s erosions, or bleeding ulcers — all these bleeds have their source in the portal hypertension which comes from cirrhosis which is caused by my auto immune system attacking my bile ducts, that is, my primary biliary cirrhosis.

I know what I was doing a year ago this afternoon: throwing up copious amounts of blood. I posted about various aspects of my Dieulafoy’s lesion (a burst artery where the esophagous meets the stomach) episode last August, but here I go again.

I suppose this was the closest I’ve come to dying, but we never know, do we? I mean, how many times have we avoided accidents by being caught at a red light or leaving the house a little earlier than planned? Slipped and bruised our limbs when we could have smashed our heads? Etc.

But leaving the hypothetical, losing enough blood to need 4 transfusions, one right after the next, is serious business. Had I been alone, or in a remote area, or in most parts of less-developed nations, I would not have survived. I was lucky in my bad luck: the EMTs arrived quickly and started oxygen and IV fluids to raise my dangerously low blood pressure, and I got to a hospital where an endoscopy procedure stopped the bleeding.

What seems remarkable now is how little effect the whole event seems to have had on me — physically and psychologically. I’ve had colds it took far longer to recover from. And I’ve had other medical crises that took a lot longer to come to terms with.

I’ve concluded there were two factors in this case that, as horrific as the experience was, made it less traumatic than you might expect:

  • I was so impaired mentally that as the crisis unfolded, I couldn’t process it.
  • It was pure bad luck. There was absolutely nothing I should have done, but didn’t, or shouldn’t have done, but did, that had anything to do with anything.

I’ll explain. When I learned later that I had been losing blood all day, I realized  the cause of some odd responses I had had that day. It’s about twenty footsteps from my bed to refrigerator, but each time I got up to refill my drink, I had to lie on the kitchen floor for a while before returning to bed. I didn’t think this worth mentioning to anyone, however. And when my husband told me that I had to go to the ER, I complained that I wouldn’t because I was too weak to go. How’s that for logic?

On the way out the door I said I had to rest, and so my husband went to get the air on in the car, and my son stayed with me. Then I started throwing up blood. I don’t remember seeing anything else until I was in the ambulance, although I am told my eyes were open.

So much I didn’t know. I thought my kids were stroking me gently as I lay still when in fact they were pressing on me with all their weight to keep me from rolling on my back and choking as I flailed about. I could hear, however (hearing is the last sense to go among the dying, interestingly). I was bothered by what sounded like a bell. Later I figured it was the metal oxygen tank.

I was in no pain. Moreover, in spite of all this drama I was not scared or worried. I was too mentally impaired, I suppose. Even when I came around in the ambulance, all I thought was, so this is what the inside of an ambulance looks like. Once in the ER, I was annoyed by the pain of the IVs and by not being allowed anything to drink, and I wanted the blood cleaned out of my hair. Only when it was time to be knocked out for the endoscopy repair job did I get upset. I guess on some level I feared not waking up.

Much later, I asked my kids what they thought when I got hauled off in the ambulance. They told me they thought I was  going to die. That’s all that continues to bother me; I am terribly sad that they went through that.

But there is a difference between being sad for them and feeling guilty, and I know that there was nothing I could have done to prevent what happened. Nothing.

Pure bad luck. There is such a thing.

Today was an uneventful day. It was an anniversary of no importance to anyone — just another day. For that I remain grateful.

Of Dieulafoy’s Lesion, Diagnoses and Doctors

InUpdate: The current (November 2014) hypothesis among my doctors is that whatever they were called in my past posts — Dieulafoy lesions, Cameron’s erosions, or bleeding ulcers — all these bleeds have their source in the portal hypertension which comes from cirrhosis which is caused by my auto immune system attacking my bile ducts, that is, my primary biliary cirrhosis.

one of my posts last month, At Risk for Esophageal Varices and I Nearly Bleed Out from a Gastric Ulcer: How Weird Is That?, I raised these questions: can a burst esophageal varice adjacent to the cardia be mistaken for a spurting gastric ulcer? Is it really possible to have such an awful gastric ulcer and no abdominal pain?

I’ve since had a follow-up endoscopy, this one by my hepatologist, and will have another in a month’s time when the clips that the GI used in his repair fall off. They obscured the full view of what the hepatologist thinks may have been neither a gastric ulcer nor an esophageal varice but something else altogether: a Dieulafoy’s lesion.

So I was a just little bit right, or not altogether wrong. My gut instinct — that I couldn’t really have a gastric ulcer — may prove right, but I got caught up in the either/or fallacy: either ulcer or varices, never knowing there could be other possibilities, like this thing called Dieulafoy’s lesion.

It isn’t surprising that a Dieulafoy’s lesion could be mistaken for an ulcer, expecially when it is spurting blood.

A Dieulafoy’s lesion is an “uncommon cause of major gastrointestinal bleeding”

caused by an abnormally large-calibre persistent tortuous submucosal artery. . . The artery protrudes through a solitary, tiny mucosal defect (2-5 mm), commonly in the upper part of the stomach. It may rupture spontaneously and lead to massive bleeding. It has been suggested that the thin mucosa overlying a pulsating artery is eroded progressively by the mechanical pressure from the abnormal vessel.

So it isn’t a disease or chronic condition. It’s a mechanical failure.

Dieulafoy’s lesions and gastric ulcers can be fixed the same way. If the fix is the same, does it matter whether the problem is a Dieulafoy’s lesion or an ulcer?

I think it does because if it is a lesion and not an ulcer, I don’t have to take drugs to inhibit the development of ulcers, and I don’t have to avoid aspirin, ibupropen, and a host of other painkillers, or make dietary changes. I don’t have to worry about an ulcer recurring, either.

So why did the GI see one thing and the hepatologist another?

I’m not sure, but I suspect what we have here is another example of the simple fact that some doctors are better than others. I know there are people who don’t question doctors because they assume anyone accepted into medical school and who makes it through the training must be pretty bright. That stands to reason.

And yet. . . have a look at the night sky. All stars are bright, but some are a lot brighter than others. That might bear remembering if you have your doubts about a diagnosis.

Recognizing a Dieulafoy’s lesion depends on “awareness of the condition and experience in endoscopy.” Experience comes with time, but awareness — well, that seems to me what separates the good from the best.

Had the GI considered Dieulafoy’s lesion as an alternative to an ulcer, then I would assume the next step would be to consider what was known about my case and compare it to what is known about these lesions.

Here are some distinguishing characteristics of Dieulafoy’s lesions:

  • The most common presenting symptom is recurrent, often massive, haematemesis associated with melaena (51%).
  • Characteristically, there are no symptoms of dyspepsia, anorexia or abdominal pain.
  • Initial examination may reveal haemodynamic instability, postural hypotension and anaemia. The mean haemoglobin level on admission has been reported to be between 8.4- 9.2 g/dl in various studies. The average transfusion requirement for the initial resuscitation is usually in excess of three and up to 8 units of packed red blood cells.
  • Approximately 75% to 95% of Dieulafoy lesions are found within 6 cm of the gastroesophageal junction, predominantly on the lesser curve.
  • A history of NSAID [nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents/analgesics] or alcohol abuse is usually absent.

 

Check, check, check, check, check: all true for me.

At Risk for Esophageal Varices and I Nearly Bleed Out from a Gastric Ulcer: How Weird Is That?

Update: The current (November 2014) hypothesis among my doctors is that whatever they were called in my past posts — Dieulafoy lesions, Cameron’s erosions, or bleeding ulcers — all these bleeds have their source in the portal hypertension which comes from cirrhosis which is caused by my auto immune system attacking my bile ducts, that is, my primary biliary cirrhosis.

If you’ve read any of my posts on primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), you were probably surprised by yesterday’s post that there wasn’t some sort of medical muddle involved. Wonder no longer: there was. It’s just that my emphasis was different so I left it for today.

I’ve written about being at risk for esophageal varices as a result of having PBC. These are swollen veins (like varicose veins), caused by portal hypertension (itself caused by cirrhosis [in the case of PBC — there are others. Click through to a site devoted to patients’ experiences with it]) in the esophagus. Left untreated these could “burst and bleed into the gut.”

But I had an endoscopy just this past January that showed only a trace of varices, and in such cases, 96% of people are trouble-free for at least 1-2 years (then they do another scope).

Of course, that means 4% of people aren’t.

So as soon as I regained consciousness in the ambulance, I alerted the chief EMT to tell the folks in the emergency room about this. And when I got there, I told them myself.

I will refrain from elaborating on how it feels while being transfused to have to repeatedly explain primary biliary cirrhosis and spell Urso Forte [the drug I take for it] to the ER nurses, and later my floor nurse and abdominal ultrasound technician.

However, following the endoscopy performed there in the ER trauma room, the GI who did the procedure reported that I lost enough blood to require four transfusions not because any esophageal varices burst, but because of a “gastric ulcer spurting blood.” He repaired it with three hemostatic clips and put me on pantoprazole.

But how weird is that? To be at risk of burst esophageal varices and have a gastric ulcer burst instead?

I reviewed my endoscopy report (high marks to the GI, who actually gave me a copy of my own medical report!) and found the location of the ulcer to be the cardia. Googled that, and discovered it is right where the esophagus becomes the stomach, and, in fact, for many years there was debate as to which organ it belonged to.

Now then, there is a new kid on the block at the hospital: the hospitalist. This person is sort of in charge of patients who come in through the ER and whose regular doctor doesn’t admit or have any role in their care. Like me. It took me two days to get someone to tell me who was really in charge of my case: the GI who did the procedure, or the hospitalist.

When the hospitalist visited me, I explained about my surprise that my bleed was gastric and not related to portal hypertension [PBC]. I told him that I didn’t have a local GI, but that I was under the care of a hepatologist at the UAB med center.

So the next day he returns, and says, “Good news: you don’t have to have a liver transplant.” I thought yeah, duh, but let him continue. He told me he had set up an appointment with the hepatologist who would do another endoscopy. And I said that sounds great, but what about this report from the GI deeming the cause of the bleed to be a gastric ulcer? The poor guy looked confused. I suggested he go back and have another (an initial) read of  my endoscopy findings.

But the hepatologist’s office and I agree that I should be seen by him. I have so many questions: can a burst esophageal varice adjacent to the cardia be mistaken for a spurting gastric ulcer? Is it really possible to have such an awful gastric ulcer and no abdominal pain? Can portal hypertension cause a gastric ulcer? Will this happen again? And will I have no warning other than feeling steam-rollered before it does?

And just how weird is it, if it was a garden variety gastric ulcer, for this to happen to a person who has to worry about bursting varices?

Stay tuned.