Who Knew a Photographer from Getty Images Went to the Moon?

“It is unlawful to falsely claim copyright or other rights in NASA material.” — from the NASA Media Usage Guidelines

So how does Getty Images get away with licensing pictures from the moon? Wouldn’t “other rights”include licensing? Maybe the judge reviewing the Carol M. Highsmith case can cast some light on this.

Go to the search bar on the Getty Images  opening page, and enter “Apollo 11.” Here are a few results (“Apollo 11” yields 81 pages):

2016-10-282016-10-28-12016-10-28-3

Now go to Google and search for “Apollo 11 Images.” Click through any of the image results that specify NASA.gov as the domain, and it won’t be long before you will find your way to the Apollo Archive of NASA,  where there are 724 images for Apollo 11 alone.

All three of these pictures, and many more that Getty is trying to license for use at $575.00 a piece, are available to download free at the Apollo Archive.  

The astronaut is Aldrin. Control number at NASA is AS11-40-5903.

The bootprint’s NASA ID  is AS11-40-5877  or AS11-40-5878.

The moon (“view of full lunar disc during return trip”) NASA ID is AS11-44-6667. 

Cost to download these images from NASA: = $0.00.

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