How PBC Became PBC

I haven’t updated since October of last year. I get comments now and then, asking how things are going. To catch you up if you are new here, I have  been writing about my battles with  Primary Biliary Cirrhosis. While I haven’t had any more esophageal bleeds or episodes of hepatic encephalopathy, this condition continues its destruction.

Although my bilirubin and albumin are worse than they were this time last year, it’s the psycho-social effects that have been devastating this winter. I intend to write more, but shorter, posts on those aspects of End Stage Liver Disease.

But first up is that I no longer have Primary Biliary Cirrhosis, according to the international health community.

I have instead Primary Biliary Cholangitis.

Cholangitis isn’t an altogether accurate a term to take the place of cirrhosis for this illness. I suppose cholangitis  was assumed a good enough switch since in both cholangitis  and primary biliary cirrhosis, the bile ducts are compromised.

But there are some very significant differences. Simple cholangitis is usually caused by a bacterial infection; primary biliary cirrhosis (cholangitis) is an auto-immune condition. The prognosis for simple  cholangitis is good if caught in time. There are a variety of treatments.

Primary Biliary Cirrhosis or Primary Biliary Cholangitis has one drug that may slow the progression of bile duct destruction. It will lead to cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease. How long this will take varies, but it will happen. The only fix is a transplant, and, since this is an auto-immune illness, it isn’t unusual for it to recur. The name made sense: primary (firstly), biliary (bile ducts destoyed), cirrhosis (inevitable effect in the long-run).

But at least the same letters apply, so PBC can become PBC.

Why change to a less accurate name?

Ignorance and prejudice. Although there are many conditions that can cause cirrhosis, the biggie is excessive alcohol use (of course, there are daily drinkers who do not reach end-stage liver disease) and hepatitis (and one of these can be caused by using dirty needles).

And so cirrhosis is a huge trigger word: this person’s lifestyle has caused her condition. For many, the social stigma is as bad as the condition itself, and the medical community decided these people have enough to deal with. They are not even close to fixing the disease, but lessening the instant self-righteousness of the unafflicted is within their range.

Say “I have primary biliary cirrhosis.” Most people hear something like “I gobblledly gook blab blab cirrhosis.” Next, they likely speculate on what vice is the cause of the problem.

It’s a rare enough illness that I have had to explain it to first responders and ER nurses.

You can feel what isn’t said: the emergency personnel have scraped up enough people killed by drunk drivers to have no sympathy for heavy drinkers.

Believe me, there are no heavy drinkers among those with PBC whose livers are failing. If the liver can no longer handle red meat, it isn’t going to be up to processing alcohol.

Maybe we once drank cheerfully and heartily. Maybe we were teetotalers. Neither would have made any difference.

At least the next time I’m hauled in my biggest problem with listing my medical history will be remembering how to spell cholangitis, and not dealing with all the baggage cirrhosis drags around.

 

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3 thoughts on “How PBC Became PBC

  1. If you are on Facebook, you might want to join PBCAngels page. I guess you know about PBCers.org? Its Yahoo Group is active, too. Everyone’s path is different, of course. Apparently a lot of people are plagued by itching, which I have never had. On the other hand, the repeated portal hypertension bleeds I had are so unusual that the doctors kept telling me it had to be some kind of bleeding ulcer, which was fine by me. (They can’t measure portal hypertension externally). Had it not been for them, I would still be asymptomatic — except for fatigue, but then again, fatigue was just as bad when I had anemia before a hysterectomy. I was never staged since my doctor said it wouldn’t change what treatment I would get, and biopsies can be deceiving, depending on where they probe. I’m actually glad I never was and could tell myself, of, probably just ulcers for as long as I did. So I have no info on how long I was in what stage. I’m pretty sure getting the shunt pushed me into Stage 4. Best of luck to you.

  2. Really glad to see a post here. Interesting rationale for the name change in that diagnosis. I remember a headline recently about new medication for Cholangitis. I do hope there will be some promising news about results. Take care there.

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